Health Benefits of Garlic

GARLIC (Allium sativum)

 Garlic can be a integral part of a health promoting diet, contributing both flavour and medicinal benefits. 

Garlic can be a integral part of a health promoting diet, contributing both flavour and medicinal benefits. 

One of the oldest cultivated plants on Earth, Sanskrit scriptures describe how the Ayervedic tradition has used this plant medicinally over 5000 years. It even appears in the medicinal papyrus of Egypt, where it is mentioned as an effective remedy for numerous ailments.

Nutritionally, garlic is a rich source of B6 vitamin and a plethora of other minerals, vitamins and phytonutrients. But the therapeutic effects of garlic’s healing powers are attributed to its volatile sulphur-containing molecule called allicin, which is produced when you crush the glove. 

Antibacterial garlic has been found effective in fighting infections (therefore its use in our flu-fighting juice) but it may also aid heart health and is useful as part of a diet designed to lower blood pressure.  The generous use of garlic, together with common onion, has also been found to be beneficially associated with better blood lipid profiles, such as healthy cholesterol levels. There are even studies suggesting cancer fighting properties, especially associated with colon cancer.

For the best medicinal benefit, buy and use fresh garlic instead of dried, flaked or ground garlic products. When buying fresh garlic, make sure the bulb feels firm to the touch and is not sprouting. Store in room temperature in a cool dark place and use generously in fresh and cooked foods alike. If you fancy a hint of garlic for your dish, cut a glove in half and sun the open cut side around the serving dish – this leaves a faint but distinct aroma without overpowering the taste.

Flu-busting juice with garlic

1 beetroot, 2 carrots, 1 lime, 1 cm / ½ inch fresh ginger, 2 cloves garlic