FAD Diets - Fiction Assisted Dieting

“Lose a stone in a week!” “The Best Kept Celebrity Secret – finally available to you!”

Sounds familiar? Ah yes, that’s the call of the FAD DIET!

 FAD diets rarely deliver sustained results or success without risks. Consult a registered, qualified nutritionist or a nutritional therapist for safe and sustainable weight loss approach. 

FAD diets rarely deliver sustained results or success without risks. Consult a registered, qualified nutritionist or a nutritional therapist for safe and sustainable weight loss approach. 

There’s an ever-increasing range of ‘quick fixes’ and ‘miracle’ options making unrealistic weight loss promises. Many of these are what I’d call a fad diet… promising a lot, but rarely delivering sustainable results.

How to spot a fad diet?

A fad diet is the kind of plan where you eat a very restrictive diet with few foods or an unusual combination of foods for a short period of time and sometimes lose weight very quickly. However, most people then get fed-up, start over-eating going back to their original diets and pile the pounds back on.

Sadly, there is no magic solution to losing weight and keeping it off long-term. Most FADs are offering a short-term fix to a long-term problem – this in itself should ring alarm bells. The key to safe and sustainable weight loss is in genuine sustained changes both in diet and lifestyle, including addressing possible root causes that led to weight gain, such as stress or unresolved negative emotions.

it can be useful to be aware of misleading weight loss claims that may lead you to waste your time and your money and even risk your health. So how can you tell fact from fiction? Stay away from diets that:

• Promise a magic bullet to solve your weight problem without having to change your lifestyle in any way

• Promise rapid weight loss of more than 2lbs of body fat a week

• Recommend magical fat-burning effects of foods (such as the grapefruit diet) or hidden ingredients in foods (the coffee diet)

• Promote eating mainly one type of food (e.g. cabbage soup, chocolate or eggs)

• Offer no supporting evidence apart from a celebrity with a personal success story to tell

• Are based on claims that we can survive without food

• Focus only on your appearance rather than on health benefits

• Are based on selling you products or supplements

• Recommendations based on a single study

• The same diet recommended for everyone without accounting for specific needs

• Are based on a ‘secret’ or a superfood that others are yet to discover

Remember, if it sounds too good to be true – it probably is! Fad-diets can be tempting as they offer a quick-fix to a long-term problem. However, they can risk your health while leaving you bewildered about what has taken place in your body – they rarely increase your own understanding or learning.

The best way to lose weight and keep it off is to make healthier choices, eat a nutritionally balanced and varied diet with appropriately sized portions, be physically active and reduce stress, be it physiological, emotional or psychological in nature. Don’t hesitate to consult a registered nutritional therapist to gain professional tools and support on how to do this.

For your health and lightness of being!

 

Based on an article which appeared at bda.uk.com